Tag Archives: Jerry Sandusky

When I’m writing I hate the red squiggles

Greetings, readers. Yesterday was a slower day on my writing project than I hoped for but I was working on my character sheets. Two days ago when I was typing I made a number of typos and as usual the spell checker put red squiggles under them. Some people can ignore that; I am not one of those people.

Every time a word is misspelled I must go back and correct it. It’s just a thing with me. What I should do is press on, ignore it, and fix the mistake later. In time when my writing flow is better I am sure I will do this. To aid me as I am trying to get into my flow, I’m going to look for the option to turn the spell checker completely off. I know that option exists. Even though I am only on page 11, I still feel like I am in second gear, where I write everyday, I can see the action in my head, and the words come easily. With yesterday being a not so great writing day, today must be better. I cannot lose my momentum.

Here’s how today is going to go. Rebecca and I will work until 12:45, then it is off to the pharmacy to get a few items, after that I will meet Traci for a quick snack, and then I will begin my work. I’ll need to stop around 6pm, because I am calling bingo tonight at 7:00. I’ll probably get back from bingo about 9:00 and then I’ll read and watch TV to relax and wind down. I find that if I’ve worked hard on my book I enjoy my off time that much more.

Our area is once again in the national news. Though I will not go into that much detail, I was very angry to see that the son of Jerry Sandusky was charged with a sex crime similar to what the Penn State’s former defensive coordinator was convicted of. Here we go again. More accusations, more trials, and another black eye for Penn State. I’m just tired of it now.

Finally, as I approach my 600th blog entry, which will be posted sometime in mid-March, I wish to ask if you, my readers, have any topic you would like me to cover. If I get a good list from folks, I will choose one and blog about it for the 600th entry.

That’s all the news for today. Until next Wednesday, have a fantastic weekend, take care, and, as always, happy reading.

Advertisements

Penn State win overshadowed by senseless destruction

Greetings, readers. I was hooting and hollering at close to midnight this past Saturday evening as the Penn State Nittany Lion football team pulled off its biggest upset since 1964. We beat the Ohio State Buckeyes who were ranked #2. I’m going to describe what happened directly after the game, though I wasn’t a witness to the worst of it.

When the game was over, it didn’t take long for the happy and enthusiastic students to run down into town from the stadium. On my street, there was the usual We Are Penn State chant, lots of whoops, hollers, and other expressions of joy. There was a  police presence downtown ready to go in case something happened, and boy, did it.

Though the folks were peaceful on my street, one block down a bunch of rowdy, probably drunk, students committed many acts of vandalism, including smashing many, if not all, the street lights on the major artery in town. How stupid can they be? Rebecca told me that she saw a comment somewhere on the internet making the point that Penn State had the opportunity with this amazing win to be seen by the rest of the world for something other than the Jerry Sandusky scandal. They threw that chance away by rioting instead.

My solution? No more night games. All that happens is these children are given an opportunity to party and get drunk all day long, then arrive at the game for an 8:00 kickoff. Yes, you heard right, I did say children. Most of these juvenile delinquents are not 21 years of age, and shouldn’t be drinking anyway. That is another topic for another blog post. If I had my way, all the games would begin at noon for three years. Call it a preventive action. If other teams cannot oblige that time, too damn bad, we’ll take a loss. Students have to be held accountable for their actions and if those actions lead to destruction, consequences must be forthcoming. Penn State University and its students must learn that you cannot drink underage and if you do, you cannot riot and/or destroy property.

Will this solution be taken? Of course not. Why? Because it makes too much sense. We have to have our night-time white-out game every year. It brings in the cash, and I will admit it is kind of cool-looking to see everyone in the stadium, less the opposing team’s fans, with their white shirts on. Let’s give it one more year and see what happens. I don’t know who the opponent is for next year’s 8:00 game, but I hope they will not riot if we pull off another upset.

Okay, I’m done venting now. Until tomorrow, go PSU, We Are Penn State, and all that good fun stuff. Take care, and happy reading.

: ) #100!!! : )

Greetings, readers. As today’s rather straightforward title implies, this is the 100th blog entry since I began in late December last year. I might not have the tremendous following like writers such as Wil Wheaton, Carrie Vaughn or John Scalzi, but I am only ten months into the blog.

I am most pleased and proud that people have continued to find my writing through search engines on almost every topic I have written about, including the Air Florida crash, the United States Football League, and my father, Professor Joseph John Kockelmans. WordPress has a stats page that I use which shows how many people view each blog post for each day. I especially like the feature that shows how many hits from each country in the world I receive. I have received hits from Russia, Romania, Mexico, Canada, and many other countries, but most of my hits are from the USA.

As most of you know by now, I have tried to stay away from politics or anything controversial. On rare occasions when something has made me good and angry, I will chime out in full force. I was going to write an entry about Romney v. Obama but I think I will wait until after the first couple of debates. Did I mention I loathe talking about politics? I always seem to be wrong.

One of the saddest moments to come along in the Penn State University world in many years was the news about the goings-on of Jerry Sandusky. The trial is over, the football season has begun under Coach Bill O’Brien and the football and academic year is moving forward. Good riddance Mr. Sandusky. I had written a piece titled Tribute to Joseph Vincent Paterno which had to be amended slightly, but I felt to delete it would be inappropriate. The man and his family did so much for this community for so many years.

On the lighter side of my blogging experience were several top ten lists, entries about my cat Keekee, news about my books, as well as a few entries from Rebecca while I was away on holidays or long weekends. {From Rebecca: I have enjoyed doing entries in the blog. Thank you, Joe, for the opportunity to do that.}

Now for ideas yet to come. I’m going to keep all my readers up-to-date on precious kitty-cat, with more pictures of her. Also, I will open up myself more and explore more deeply what makes me tick, and share it with you. This year I felt as though I wanted to be liked. Now it’s time to cut and bleed onto the page and push the envelope, as they say.

With my book signing at Webster’s Bookstore and Cafe this Friday, the work schedule for the week has been altered slightly. Look for another blog entry on Friday, or if not, definitely next Wednesday. Here’s to #101 and beyond.

Have a great day, take care, and happy reading.

Was the Freeh report really free?

Greetings, readers. I have been thinking long and hard about whether or not I am going to amend in any way my blog entry titled “Tribute to Joseph Vincent Paterno.” Since this blog entry was posted, much has transpired, such as the guilty verdict of his former defensive coordinator, Jerry Sandusky, and the Freeh report which implicated Coach Paterno himself.

To my family and me, Joe Paterno, I must admit, was three notches below a deity. Yes, I always knew deep down that he was a man, and fallible as all men are, but I still found it difficult to accept that Coach Paterno might have known about all this and did as little as he did.

The NCAA sanctions, I believe, are a wee bit strong, however justified. If that sounds like a contradiction in terms, let me explain. All of the players on all those teams since 1998 whose victories got erased must know deep in their hearts that they were indeed victorious. What is being punished is the institution of Penn State, as well as Coach Paterno and Jerry Sandusky. With that said, here is my personal opinion on the four major points of the NCAA ruling.

Loss of scholarships: Absolutely. To me that is standard for any school who commits major offenses in any capacity, and it will allow PSU the opportunity to put academics and athletics on even ground.

The $60 million fine: I agree with it completely. Yes it is a lot of money, but I am glad it is going to programs for abused children. Most appropriate.

No bowl appearances for four years: I agree in principle but have no clue where they got the number of years they chose.

And finally, the loss of 112 victories: This number, I’ve learned, was determined by the first time that Mr. Sandusky was caught in any wrong doings. Lord only knows if there were more before that. When I first heard this I was outraged, but the more I’ve read and studied, the more I agree with it. As I’ve said before, those kids from the past know they won those games.

Was the Freeh report really free? No. It has come with a humongous price tag. Not only to the creditability and the reputation of this university, but also to the possible and probably crunch on the local economy. Instead of doing their own investigation, the NCAA based their sanctions on this report. And it will cost money to implement the recommendations that Freeh laid out. I have not heard whether or not people have sold back their season tickets or not. As I understand it, the big 10 football network has not dropped their TV coverage. It will take years to know the full extent of the damage. Both Rebecca and I are proud of the new administration of the University for accepting the consequences with such grace.

My thoughts and prayers go out to the victims and their families.