Tag Archives: Cy Greco

My health, what is the worst that can happen? My heart could go splat

Greetings, readers. An incident happened yesterday afternoon which has seriously made me reconsider what is going on in my life right now. I am now making it publicly known that I am having some minor heart issues. At least I hope they are minor. I was sent home early yesterday from my fast food job because my irregular heartbeat would not calm itself. I am glad I am getting it checked tomorrow.

While I am at the doctor’s Thursday afternoon, Rebecca will be putting up the blog from home. I am taking off tomorrow completely to rest before my stress test. Let me explain the current phenomena. The heart goes wrong when I’m stressed, when I’m tired, or quite often after I sit down from an activity. The fluttering sensation lasts about 5 to 15 seconds and then goes away. If anybody can give me information about what this might be, please leave a comment in the comment section or catch me on my Facebook page. Any info would be most helpful.

I know that pessimism is a bad trait but last evening I could not help but think of all the bad things that could go wrong in the coming weeks. What is the doctor going to say? What is the stress test going to show? I’m so paranoid, I’m going to pack an overnight bag in case the doctor sends me right to the hospital. For those of you who want a chuckle, yes, I was a boy scout for one day and remember their motto is always be prepared.

I also began to do an overview of my life last evening, starting from an early age and going right on up through the years. I had a happy childhood, and high school was fine, then things started to go wrong. Because of my disability that no one in my family wanted to address, myself included, I did not graduate from Penn State University. I failed. Later on I got married. That didn’t work either. I failed. My writing career is not that much to speak of, less the blog and a few small completed works. I won’t call that a failure, but I’m not paying the rent with my royalties. I’m sure you can see the pattern here.

I also started to think about my time at Bear Spring Camps. Oh, the joyous childhood memories I have with Mr. Greco, Dave, and everyone who has camped there over the years. I consider them all my family. With this season’s camp week approaching in a few months, last night I asked myself just how many more years do I think I’ll be able to go? As a naïve youngster, I thought I would go until the day I died. Well, this camp season might be it for me. Perhaps not. But I don’t see myself going for another 25 years. Either health or lack of money will prevent that.

Yes, readers, times change, people’s health deteriorates, and the carefree happiness of youth turns into the hard reality of adulthood. I will have some of the test results by the end of tomorrow. With all the information in, I will be able to make a plan about staying at my job or having to give it up to take care of my health issue. I hope not, I actually love my job.

Well, this macabre entry has gone on long enough. I’ll close on a cheerful note. Views of my gaming channel videos have improved slightly. Rebecca told me this morning that I need to add my full name to the tags, as it will make it easier for people to find said videos in a YouTube search of just my name. Thank you very much to Rebecca.

Rebecca will chime in tomorrow and we’ll both be back as usual next Wednesday. Until then, take care, have a great few days, and happy reading.

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Virtual Bear Spring Camps

Greetings, readers. A few years ago, when I had the proper video equipment, I took all of my Bear Spring Camps VHS tapes that I had recorded over the years, and made myself something special. I called it Bear Spring Camps: The Day. Some of the highlights are an early morning video of the lake, seeing people in the dining room at a meal, an afternoon boat ride, and even a full ride in the car down to Belgrade Lakes and back. Back in the days that I had less to do with my time, when I was back home, I would sometimes put on these videos at the appropriate time of day and it would really make me feel like I was at Bear Spring Camps.

I made these videos from 1984 through 1987. I brought my camcorder with me every summer and would record, record, record. This is the same period of time when I sat down with Cy Greco and recorded conversations with him; those of you who read my first book, Picking Up Where We Left Off: My Bear Spring Camp Stories, might remember what I wrote about these fireside chats. Obviously not everything I filmed made it into Bear Spring Camps: The Day. But a good chunk of it did. My favorite part is one early evening inside the cabin when I rested the camcorder on the table next to my favorite chair. The radio was on in the background and I happened to record about 30 minutes of a country radio station. It completely recreated that after-supper-time-to-relax feeling and it did it very well. I’ve watched this part over and over again ever since and enjoyed all those songs. I found and added to my playlist for my last show “Do You Love Me (Just Say Yes)”, performed by Highway 101.

Could I mass produce these tapes and sell them? I think I have an idea here, if I had the right equipment or the money to get it. The virtual vacation. Sure there are videos on YouTube of sunsets, waterfalls, and rain on a canvas tent, but I’ve never seen a video that would take you through an entire day at camp. Maybe I could use GoFundMe.com to finance my idea. That will require some thought.

I know that this is the second Bear Spring Camps entry within two weeks, but I am still very excited about camp opening, the warmer weather in general, and my upcoming August trip. I will probably be making plans and reservations tomorrow, or next week at the latest. Drop me a note, here or on Facebook, if you think my idea of the virtual vacation is a good one. I might pursue it.

Until tomorrow, take care, have a wonderful day, and as always happy reading.

Inspection time is around the corner

Greetings, readers. Yes, my world was thrown into a junior blind panic today as the notice of inspection was handed out. This does happen every year, but I always go into a tizzy. I’m a naturally messy homemaker, and my body won’t allow long cleaning sessions at one time. I am writing and editing today without Rebecca. She’s been under the weather the last two days. I’m sure she’ll be back next Wednesday, and it will be good to have her. My editing skills are not quite up to hers. After my work day today, room cleaning begins. I am tired of living like a slob; a real life Oscar Madison. All I have to do is put my mind to it, and once the place is clean, I can keep it that way. My dear friend, Uncle Cy Greco, once said, “A place for everything and everything in its place.” Right now I could say, “A typhoon hit my apartment and nothing is in its place.” Well, I’ll conclude this short blog entry today by asking you all to throw good thoughts Rebecca’s way to feel better and for my back to allow me to clean up my place without spasms. Until next week, take care, have a great weekend and happy reading.

Update: I passed the inspection!

The Changing of the Guard, a story by me

Greetings, readers. I want to share a story from my third Bear Spring Camps book with you. I am now on the fence about writing BSC 3 this year after all. I will let you know when I am writing it again in earnest. For now, I want to share one of my favorite stories that I wrote for the book so far.

Until tomorrow, take care and happy reading. I hope you like this story.

The Changing of the Guard

            This camp season, 2013, was a particularly satisfying one for me. When I was a young boy visiting Bear Spring Camps, I had my Uncle Cy Greco to love and care for me, to take me fishing, to tell me stories, and to teach me about life. Now that he is gone, I cherish those memories, and not a day goes by that I don’t think of him at least once.

            For the last few years, I have sat at Dave Trost’s table with his family, of which I am honored to be a part. His grand nieces and nephews have become a huge of part of my life as well as his. We take them fishing and on boat rides, but it’s times when the sweet little girls, Ava, Kennedy, and Emma ask Uncle Joey for story time, where the experience comes full circle. Now I am the uncle figure, set to enrich their lives.

            This particular year contained two very fulfilling story hours. The first took place at Ava and Kennedy’s cabin where their parents were outside having a bonfire. I volunteered to entertain the young ones and shared my stories and experiences from Bear Spring Camps. The five children there were Paul and Luke Gonzales, and Ava, Kennedy, and Emma Harvey. The children also enjoyed hearing about how their Uncle Dave and Uncle Joey met and became friends as young kids. I told them their Uncle Dave was our paperboy, and a few years older than me. I was being picked on by a couple of neighborhood kids and Dave took exception to this. After chasing the kids away, we quickly, over the next few days and weeks, became great friends. Dave would save the last paper to be delivered for Mom and Dad’s house so that he would be done with his route for the day, and be ready to toss that ball around, or listen to a record.

The other story they really liked was when Dave and I as teenagers were at camp and he thought he heard something outside the cabin. He went to investigate in his bare feet. I heard him trip over something, and moments later saw him stumbling back towards the camp. As it turns out, he had broken his big toe on a large stump. Mom was down in Waterville visiting Jiggs Mosher and was not there to witness David’s injury. He had told me that he didn’t want Mom to find out. I reluctantly went along with this and promised to keep my mouth shut. We both came to the conclusion that he should try to wash the dirt out of it, and all the kids got a chuckle when I explained David’s reaction when the water hit his toe. It hurt so bad that he pounded his fist against the shower stall. It sounded like rumbling thunder. The next morning, with Mom being unaware that anything had gone wrong, Dave tried to put his foot in his shoe. He let out a yelp or made face or something, which I tried to imitate for the children. They were not laughing at Uncle Dave being injured; they just liked the silly face I made. Mom figured that all wasn’t right and demanded an explanation. I went ahead and told my mom what had happened the night before. Mom wondered why we were trying to keep the injury from her; I’m not quite certain but I think that Dave was a little embarrassed that he had gone outside in the pitch dark without shoes. It was either that or he perhaps thought that she would take him to the emergency room and who wants to spend the day away from camp at the ER? He convinced her that he was ok and just wouldn’t wear a shoe, which made walking bearable.

            As I sat there in that cabin with children all around me, not only did I feel like an uncle, but I got the sense that if this is what parenting is, I love it. To be able to tell children stories, to entertain them, and make them smile, is truly a wonderful thing.

            I promised to tell them more stories the next night at the bonfire, but it rained. I didn’t want to break my promise, so a few nights later I held a story evening in my cabin. With cousins Paul and Luke Gonzales having already gone home, it was just Ava, Kennedy, and Emma who were brought to my cabin for more stories. The girls were given a soda and had a chance to choose where they would sit. Even though it wasn’t a terribly cold night outside, I turned on the camp’s propane heater so that we would have a flickering flame, to make-believe that it was our own campfire. Over that priceless hour, the girls wanted to hear the tale of how Uncle Dave fished for his old shoes, that he had discarded in the lake years earlier, and they wanted to hear another adventure from when we were both children. I, of course, gladly complied.

            Somehow I get the feeling that I will never be a parent. So helping to raise David’s nieces and nephews, and now the grand nieces and nephews, is my chance. With the love and affection Uncle Cy showed me over the years and the compassion I learned from my own parents, I am ready to be a parent or uncle figure to these wonderful children. It has come full circle. I am now what Uncle Cy was to me. The guard has now been changed.