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Greetings, readers. I was searching through YouTube for something enjoyable to watch, besides Reba, and I typed in Sherlock Holmes. To my happy surprise, several of his films were listed. Both of the films I watched were from the 1940s. The first one was actually just under an hour long and the second one, slightly longer, was an hour and eleven minutes. Oh, how times have changed. Today you are hard pressed to find a film under an hour and a half.

The first movie I watched, from 1946, was about a murder that took place on a train and was called Terror by Night. The two stars were Basil Rathbone as Sherlock Holmes and Nigel Bruce as Dr. Watson. From the outset I knew I’d be hooked because the story began with Holmes and Watson going to Edinburgh, Scotland on a train. Holmes was to guard a valuable diamond, and of course that was the prize catch for someone to steal. Shortly into the movie there is a murder; the son of the elderly woman who owned the diamond. Holmes and Watson conducted interviews with the suspects on the train one by one to discover who the thief and murderer was.

What really made this movie enjoyable for me was it took place on an old steam locomotive. As some of you might know from me writing about Train Simulator, looking at the old English carriages, with each compartment having its own door, was nostalgic. Another thing that was enjoyable for me was that these two films were in black and white, and the special effects were minimal. Back then, they concentrated on story line quality and good acting. I’m not going to give away the ending to either of these films, no spoiler alerts here. So let’s move on to the second film.

Sherlock Holmes and the Voice of Terror, from 1942, was an equally intriguing and enjoyable film. It was set during World War II, as the Third Reich was destroying London. Everyday a radio broadcast, at first believed to be from Germany, would hit London’s airwaves, not only describing how poorly England was doing in the war, but also warning of impending disasters. Holmes found it odd that these catastrophes would occur either as the broadcast was taking place or shortly thereafter. It was fascinating to me to watch Holmes in action as he deduced where these broadcasts were actually coming from.

Both these films starred Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce, who were in series of Sherlock Holmes films in the 1940s. I do understand that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s original setting for his stories and books was in London and in the late 1800s. That was another thing I found so interesting about these two films. You can take these two characters and 221b Baker street, put them in any era, and it works. How brilliant.

Not only has last night’s entertainment spurred my interest in watching more of these films, but after work hours I’m going to the library to get one of the original books. I’m looking forward to it greatly. Remember, I did want to read more; it is on my list of things to do.

I shall keep you updated with how my new interest in Sherlock Holmes progresses. I don’t know how many movies were made but I intend to watch them all.

Until Friday, have a wonderful couple of days, take care, and happy reading.

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